Tag: thanksgiving

Thanksgiving Quiche Puts Sweet Potatoes Front and Center

Sweet potatoes are a favorite side dish at Thanksgiving dinner tables. Packed with vitamins, nutrients, fiber, and delectable flavor, sweet potatoes have earned their place on holiday dinner tables. While many holiday hosts bake, fry or mash their sweet potatoes, these beloved tubers can be prepared in other ways as well.

If you want to put a new twist on this Thanksgiving staple, whip up this recipe for “Sweet Potato Quiche,” courtesy of the North Carolina Sweet Potato Commission. Submitted to the NC State Fair Tailgate Recipe Contest by Kristen Frybort, this recipe marries sweet tubers with decadent cheese, rich cream and savory spices.

 
 

Sweet Potato Quiche

Makes 8 servings

2 cups sweet potatoes, peeled and diced into small cubes

3⁄4 cup yellow onion, diced

21⁄2 tablespoons olive oil

1⁄2 teaspoon salt

Black pepper to taste

Egg mixture:

4 eggs

1 cup heavy cream

1⁄2 teaspoon fresh rosemary, minced

1⁄2 tablespoon fresh parsley, minced

11⁄2 teaspoons salt

1⁄4 teaspoon pepper

3 ounces Gruyere cheese, shredded

Pre-baked deep dish pie crust

Preheat oven to 400 F. Mix together the first five ingredients and place on baking sheet. Roast in the oven for 15 to 20 minutes. While sweet potatoes and onions are roasting, shred cheese and set aside. Whisk the egg mixture and set aside. Once potatoes and onions have finished roasting, spoon them into the pre-baked pie shell. Next, layer the shredded cheese on top of the sweet potatoes. Reduce oven to 375 F. Pour egg mixture over the cheese and potatoes. Place quiche in the oven on a center rack. Bake 20 to 25 minutes, or until eggs are set.

Gobble Up Turkey Nutrition Facts

Turkeys are seemingly everywhere come November, whether it’s at your favorite grocery store, on television cooking shows and possibly hanging out in the wild of a nearby nature preserve. Turkeys are the main course for many holiday dinners, and turkey leftovers also make for popular meals once holidays have come and gone. Although turkeys earn most of their attention during the holiday season, their health benefits can be enjoyed throughout the year.

Turkey contains roughly 34 calories and 1 gram of fat per ounce (33 grams) of meat. It is low in saturated fat and is a good source of protein. In fact, just one 3 to 4 ounce serving of turkey provides 65 percent of a person’s recommended daily intake of protein. Protein helps fuel the body and can help a person feel full longer.

People who are customizing their diets to protect against cancer may want to include turkey on the menu. Turkey contains selenium, which can promote healthy function of the thyroid and boost the immune system. Selenium also helps to eliminate free radicals in the body through its antioxidant power.

Those who need to increase their B vitamin intake also can turn to turkey. According to Livestrong, a serving of turkey has 36 percent of the daily allowance of vitamin B3, which helps process fats in the body. It also contains 27 percent of the RDA for vitamin B6, which helps maintain steady blood sugar levels, among other things. In addition to these vitamins, turkey also is rich in many minerals, including iron, phosphorous, potassium, and zinc. While turkey is healthy, the way it is prepared can affect just how beneficial it is to one’s diet. For example, slathering the meat with butter or dousing it in rich gravies may negate some of turkey’s positive attributes.

One of the most popular ways to cook turkey is to roast it. Let fresh herbs and a citrus juice marinade add the desired flavor. Place the turkey on a roasting rack so that any fat will drain to the bottom of the pan. Baste the turkey with fresh marinade to keep it moist.

It’s best to cook any stuffing outside of the turkey so there is no potential for contamination by bacteria. Make stuffing healthier by using whole-grain rice, vegetables, dried fruits, and nuts in lieu of a heavy bread base. Leftover roasted turkey can be ground and used to make tacos and burgers or chopped and turned into turkey salad. The possibilities for leftover turkey are endless, especially for cooks willing to try their hands at something new.

Choose Lighter Fare This Thanksgiving

Statistics indicate the average Thanksgiving dinner exceeds 3,000 calories. That is more calories than a person should eat in an entire day, much less a single meal. Many people admit to indulging on bigger portions and more fattening foods come the holiday season, but choosing some lighter fare this Thanksgiving can make the meal healthier without sacrificing taste.

Although there are staples of Thanksgiving dinner, many low-calorie foods can be included to make the meal healthier. The following are a few healthy substitutions or alterations holiday hosts can make when preparing their Thanksgiving feasts.


* Trim down the turkey. Play up the main course with aromatic seasonings or unexpected flavors. Use garlic, olive oil and basil to add a boost of flavor to turkey without having to rely on butter or salt. Marinate the bird with lemon juice and citrus marmalade for a sweet, yet pungent flavor. Consider omitting the bread stuffing and making a stew of roasted root vegetables instead.

* Opt for turkey breast. White meat of a turkey tends to have less fat and calories than the darker cuts. Serve turkey breasts only, which will not only cut down on calories, but also on the amount of time needed to cook the meal.

* Make homemade cranberry sauce. Taking the time to make your own cranberry sauce means you can control the ingredients. Cut down on the amount of sugar used in the recipe or substitute it with honey or molasses.

* Reduce the number of courses. Thanksgiving dinner often features multiple courses. Extra courses can be expensive, but such massive spreads also lead many people to overeat. Stick to two or three courses, and chances are guests will not miss the extra food.

* Choose whole-grain breads. Sliced whole-grain breads or rolls paired with an olive tapenade will be flavorful and such breads are healthier than white bread and butter.

* Flavor vegetables with herbs. Vegetables grilled or sauteed with fresh herbs may be so flavorful they will not need added dressings that tend to be rich or cream- or butter-based. Have a wide variety of vegetable side dishes available so guests can fill up on healthier fare rather than more calorie-dense items.

* Serve only low- or no-calorie drinks. Beverages can add a substantial amount of calories to Thanksgiving meals. Give guests the option of sparkling water or even diluted cider so they’re not filling up on sugary sodas or other high-calorie beverages.

* Serve fresh fruit for dessert. Create a fresh fruit salad that can be served in lieu of fatty cakes and pastries.

* Include other activities. Do not make the meal the centerpiece of the celebration. Plan activities, such as a game of football in the yard or a walk around the neighborhood. This places a smaller emphasis on eating while giving guests the opportunity to burn off some of their meal.

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Stress Free Thanksgiving Tips

Less stress means more time for what matters – spending time with family and friends and reflecting on what we’re thankful for! Follow our top tips for making your holiday season less stressful!

*Plan a potluck – If you’re cooking the turkey, ask guests to bring a side or dessert. When everyone contributes it can lead to a more meaningful meal and a fun way to share favorite family recipes.

*Choose make-ahead recipes to save time & stress the day of! If you’re hosting, you can even set the table the day ahead to help save time.

*Switch up the traditional menu – try brunch! You can still have turkey too – turkey bacon, turkey sausage or how about a nice turkey tenderloin alongside quiche!

*Opt. for eating out – Skip the mess and cleanup all together by dining out this Thanksgiving!

*Donate your time to charity – Celebrate the holidays by giving back. Consider donating your time or goods to local charities in need.